bookspaperscissors:

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that thousand of people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.
Three minutes went by and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried up to meet his schedule.
A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping continued to walk.
A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.
The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.
In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.
No one knew this but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the best musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written with a violin worth 3.5 million dollars.
Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston and the seats average $100.
This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of an social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?
One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:
If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?
(Photo of Joshua Bell by Eric Kabik)
bookspaperscissors:

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that thousand of people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.
Three minutes went by and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried up to meet his schedule.
A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping continued to walk.
A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.
The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.
In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.
No one knew this but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the best musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written with a violin worth 3.5 million dollars.
Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston and the seats average $100.
This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of an social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?
One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:
If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?
(Photo of Joshua Bell by Eric Kabik)

bookspaperscissors:

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that thousand of people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the best musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written with a violin worth 3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston and the seats average $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of an social experiment about perception, taste and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

(Photo of Joshua Bell by Eric Kabik)

I have a beautiful grey violin that looks kinda like this. I will learn how to play it one day…! This summer I shall restart the learning process!

I have a beautiful grey violin that looks kinda like this. I will learn how to play it one day…! This summer I shall restart the learning process!

littlestarlolo:

ezios-vitals:

limiculous:

Yes, it’s violin. With dubstep.

WHAT IS THIS EARGASM I AM HAVING

Jesus *_*

I don’t think you understand how much I love this.

Played 1301827 times.
waywardvictorianconfessions:

I know it will take years and years… but I hope that one day I can play violin as beautifully as she can.

waywardvictorianconfessions:

I know it will take years and years… but I hope that one day I can play violin as beautifully as she can.

I broke another string trying to tune my violin myself because I feel bad having to ask other people to do it for me all the time because tl;dr musically retarded.

Online tuners confuse me so I thought hey, I’ll do this shit by ear! Nope! Fucking string snapped and of course it was one of the strings I don’t have an extra for.

I’ll just order a new string, then wait until I can afford my own tuner so I can learn how to do this shit myself and NOT royally fuck up every time. 

ilikeartalot:

violina by boris indrikov

ilikeartalot:

violina by boris indrikov

The Burdened especially will be hard. Those high notes I don’t even x__x

But I’m excited anyway.

Same here. I have forgotten how and now I just wanna relearn! <3

Same here. I have forgotten how and now I just wanna relearn! <3

But I almost have it perfect! And god damn it I will have it fucking complete and perfect by tomorrow afternoon! >:D

And then… I shall move on! Do bigger and brighter things! …. or just play Dragon Quest.

Also I have been looking for an excuse to use this forever… might as well be now! >:D

beautiful violin is beautifulllll!

obsequiousness:

julienh:

“La sensualité, c’est la mobilisation maximale des sens: on observe l’autre intensément et on écoute ses moindres bruits.” L’insoutenable légèreté de l’être (1984) Milan Kundera

play with me

I saw this pic a while ago and have been looking for it. SO glad it popped back up randomly on my dash..! <3

I think it’s just a beautiful picture and concept